Wednesday, 9 December 2015

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10 Dec 2015

Prepared by ashok sharma

Read Editorials with hindi vocab at http://everydayquiz.blogspot.in/

 

The Hindu: December 10, 2015

The Gandhis must face the courts



Whatever be the merits of the charges against the principal office-bearers of the Congress party in the 'National Herald' case, it is an issue that has to be settled in a court of law, and not in the wider political arena, much less in Parliament. If the Congress believes there has been no wrongdoing in the transactions related to the acquisition of Associated Journals Private Ltd. by Young Indian, a non-profit company in which the party's president, Sonia Gandhi, and vice-president, Rahul Gandhi, are the main shareholders, it must simply choose the judicial route to establish their innocence. The Delhi High Court order upholding the trial court summons to both of them, along with other directors of Young Indian, is based on what it sees as prima facie evidence of criminality. The best way to deal with the situation is to face it legally. When Subramanian Swamy first questioned the legality of the transactions, it was the Congress that challenged him to take Ms. Gandhi and her son to court. "It is for those who make allegations to prove their charges," the party had said in 2012. It cannot then turn around now and say that the entire proceedings amount to political vendetta. Even if there is a political motive, the party's president and vice-president have to provide answers to the questions that have arisen from the trial court summons and the High Court's refusal to intervene. To disrupt Parliament on an issue that involves no larger public interest goes against all democratic norms, and it cannot be justified on any count. Indeed, to speak of political vendetta following a court summons is to cast aspersions on the very independence of the judiciary.



A look at the facts of the case does make one doubt whether AJL could not have protected its shareholders' interests by liquidating some of its assets in order to return its loan to the Congress. The floating of Young Indian, described by the court as a 'special purpose vehicle', does cast some suspicion. At the same time, the weak point in Dr. Swamy's case seems to be the absence of any identifiable victim who has been cheated or whose funds have been misappropriated. After all, the various assets of AJL still stand in its name and the shareholders of Young Indian, which being a Section 25 (non-profit) company, cannot get any dividend or profit out of the company's rental income. The Congress will have to believe in its own contention that there was no 'entrustment' in the first place for anyone's trust to be breached and that no one claims to be deceived or cheated. But the judicial process will have to be faced squarely without resort to political theatre. The charges of cheating and criminal breach of trust against the Congress leaders will have to be countered only through the legal route.

 

mer·it

The quality of being particularly good or worthy, especially so as to deserve praise or reward.

 

bear·er

A person or thing that carries or holds something.

 

a·re·na

A level area surrounded by seats for spectators, in which sports, entertainments, and other public events are held.

 

sum·mons

An order to appear before a judge or magistrate, or the writ containing it

 

ven·det·ta

A blood feud in which the family of a murdered person seeks vengeance on the murderer or the murderer's family.

 

in·ter·vene

Come between so as to prevent or alter a result or course of events.

 

as·per·sion

An attack on the reputation or integrity of someone or something.

 

float

Rest or move on or near the surface of a liquid without sinking.

 

sus·pi·cion

A feeling or thought that something is possible, likely, or true.

 

con·ten·tion

Heated disagreement.

 

coun·ter

Speak or act in opposition to

 

The Hindu: December 10, 2015

Trumpeting bigotry



American politics touched a new low this week when Donald Trump, a frontrunner for the Republican presidential nomination, called for a "total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States". Mr. Trump's controversial remarks in the past, including offensive statements about undocumented Mexican immigrants being rapists, insults to war veterans and sexist attacks on women in the media, drew expected criticism from Democrats and other liberals. Yet, this time even fellow Republican candidates and mainstream Republican Party heavyweights distanced themselves from Mr. Trump's views on Muslims. The property mogul's comment contradicts, morally if not legally, the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which requires that "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof". Islamophobia in the U.S., which surged after the 9/11 terror attacks, appears to be on the rise again. This time it is coterminous with soaring worldwide anxiety about Islamic State, which has been linked to the Paris terror attacks of November and last week's shooting in San Bernardino, California. Little wonder then that the numerically significant cohorts of the U.S. conservative fold are lapping up Mr. Trump's incendiary, divisive proposal. Their support is manifested in the one polling trend that has baffled campaign analysts, Mr. Trump's evergreen lead over all other candidates, which shows no sign of withering in the face of his increasingly reckless provocations. After this week's foray into apparent bigotry, a rolling five-day poll by Reuters placed his support vote at 35.6 per cent, giving him a comfortable lead over Florida's Senator Marco Rubio, a distant second at 14.9 per cent.



The Trump phenomenon begs questions both tactical and strategic. Tactically, he has made a stark choice in the matter of battle-versus-war and it could well win him the Republican nomination. His steady march to the far right of American politics is a safe bet that he will emerge, or has already emerged, as the favourite of those who championed the cause of the Tea Party, of immigration hawks, pro-lifers, white supremacists, gun-lovers and all manner of conservatives. However, that leaves the rest of America unaccounted for, especially the elusive median and swing voters. Unless Mr. Trump abruptly changes tack post-nomination, a move that could prove politically costly in itself, he may have handed the Democratic nominee, likely to be Hillary Clinton, the keys to the Oval Office next year. Beyond the nomination battle, the broader strategic link between the rise of IS and the worldwide proliferation of Islamophobia is paramount. Perhaps mindful of this link, Ms. Clinton has moved in exactly the opposite direction, towards the political centre. She has taken a firmer stand against IS than President Barack Obama did, yet spoken expansively about fostering an attitude of inclusiveness. Depending on which paradigm prevails, post-2016 America will either continue to welcome minorities to its shores, or emerge as a source of recruitment propaganda for extremists.

 

big·ot·ry

Intolerance toward those who hold different opinions from oneself.

 

front run·ner

The contestant that is leading in a race or other competition.

 

im·mi·grant

A person who comes to live permanently in a foreign country.

 

co·ter·mi·nous

Having the same boundaries or extent in space, time, or meaning.

 

soar

Fly or rise high in the air

 

co·hort

An ancient Roman military unit, comprising six centuries, equal to one tenth of a legion.

 

lap

Overtake (a competitor in a race) to become one or more laps ahead.

 

in·cen·di·ar·y

(of a device or attack) designed to cause fires.

 

man·i·fest

Display or show (a quality or feeling) by one's acts or appearance; demonstrate.

 

baf·fle

Totally bewilder or perplex.

 

prov·o·ca·tion

Action or speech that makes someone annoyed or angry, especially deliberately

 

for·ay

A sudden attack or incursion into enemy territory, especially to obtain something; a raid.

 

tac·ti·cal

Of, relating to, or constituting actions carefully planned to gain a specific military end.

 

hawk

A diurnal bird of prey with broad rounded wings and a long tail, typically taking prey by surprise with a short chase

 

e·lu·sive

Difficult to find, catch, or achieve.

 

fos·ter

Encourage or promote the development of (something, typically something regarded as good).

 

par·a·digm

A typical example or pattern of something; a model

 

shore

A prop or beam set obliquely against something weak or unstable as a support.

 

prop·a·gan·da

Information, especially of a biased or misleading nature, used to promote or publicize a particular political cause or point of view.

 

 

Business Standard

Rural distress intensifies

 

Even as India celebrates the golden jubilee of the Green Revolution, the National Sample Survey Organisation (NSSO) has come out with data indicating that nearly 70 per cent of farmers subsist on economically unviable farm holdings of less than a hectare in size. Over one-fifth of farm households report salaried employment, and not farming, as the prime source of their income. Around 44 per cent others have to seek work under the Mahatma Gandhi National Rural Employment Guarantee Scheme to supplement their income. Little wonder that the owners of such tiny farms have a strong urge to migrate to urban areas. Farmer distress is particularly acute at present since 18 of the 29 states are facing drought in one part or the other for the second year in a row. This is only the fourth occasion of a back-to-back drought in over 100 years - the last one being in 1986 and 1987.



The Green Revolution, which undeniably ended the country's "ship-to-mouth" existence and transformed it into an exporter of rice and wheat, has also led to lopsided growth in agriculture, causing regional and other disparities. It has remained confined to a few crops - wheat, rice, sugarcane and, of late, cotton and maize - and to a few states in the northwest and south with well-developed irrigation facilities. The growth of these crops has been supported also by assured marketing at fixed prices (minimum support prices or MSP) through open-ended procurement. Eastern India, which is well endowed with water resources and other prerequisites for agricultural growth, including cheap labour, remained agriculturally backward till recently, when the attention shifted to it for ushering in the "second green revolution". Equally neglected has been the rain-dependent farming practised on over 55 per cent of the country's arable land. Many essential commodities, including pulses and oilseeds, are grown largely by small and marginal farmers on lands that are not irrigated. These have gained little from the latest farm technologies which relied on improved seeds, water and fertilisers to show results. The imports of these commodities have, consequently, been surging steadily and are expected to hit new highs this year.



While it is true that new technologies and agronomic practices have tended to impart a degree of drought-resilience to farming - as reflected in farm output during every drought year being higher than the previous one - the same cannot be said for the drought-proofing of agriculture through development of irrigation. The total area irrigated from surface water resources has more or less stagnated, as no new major or medium irrigation project has been taken up for decades. Unless irrigation facilities expand, it is futile to expect the drought-proofing of agriculture.



Nor have much-needed agriculture sector reforms made any headway. Little has been done in vital areas like land consolidation, making land leasing legal, reforming farm marketing and improving sustainability of agriculture. Job and income generation opportunities in the rural non-farm sector, to absorb those who want - or, indeed, need - to quit farming, are also few. The need, therefore, is to push through critical reforms in the farm sector, to make the Green Revolution relatively more broad-based, and to create productive employment avenues in rural areas to deal with sustained rural distress.

 

dis·tress

Extreme anxiety, sorrow, or pain.

 

in·ten·si·fy

Become or make more intense

 

un·vi·a·ble

Not capable of working successfully; not feasible.

 

a·cute

(of a bad, difficult, or unwelcome situation or phenomenon) present or experienced to a severe or intense degree.

 

drought

A prolonged period of abnormally low rainfall; a shortage of water resulting from this.

 

lop·sid·ed

With one side lower or smaller than the other.

 

dis·par·i·ty

A great difference.

 

en·dow

Give or bequeath an income or property to (a person or institution).

 

pre·req·ui·site

A thing that is required as a prior condition for something else to happen or exist.

 

ush·er

Show or guide (someone) somewhere.

 

surge

(of a crowd or a natural force) move suddenly and powerfully forward or upward.

 

stag·nate

(of water or air) cease to flow or move; become stagnant.

 

head·way

Move forward or make progress, especially when circumstances make this slow or difficult.

 

av·e·nue

A broad road in a town or city, typically having trees at regular intervals along its sides.

 

 

Indian Express

Not just GST





The squalling in Parliament is adversely affecting not just the legislation to finally install the much-delayed goods and services tax regime but also a host of other bills which have received far less public attention.

The Real Estate (Regulation and Development) Bill 2015, which received the cabinet nod on Wednesday, is an example of a legislative measure that promises to radically reform a crucial sector. The bill is scheduled to be presented in the Rajya Sabha in the ongoing winter session, but it is unlikely to be taken up if the opposition parties, especially the Congress, continue to hold up business. On the GST bill, the Congress has staked out a position that is different on at least three counts from that taken by the ruling BJP, but there is more convergence on the real estate regulator bill. The latest version of the real estate bill, based on the report of a select committee of the Rajya Sabha, which also had Congress representation, incorporates several changes demanded by the opposition parties.

The real estate regulator bill is expected to qualitatively enhance consumer protection in a sector that has long had a lopsided builder-buyer equation. It aims at establishing a Real Estate Regulatory Authority in states and Union territories to monitor real estate transactions. The objective is to institutionalise transparency and accountability, boost consumer confidence, and promote timely execution and professionalism in the sector while making it easier to access capital and financial markets. It will cover both residential and commercial projects. The bill stipulates mandatory disclosure of all registered projects, including details of the promoter, layout plan and the statuses of approvals. The cabinet-approved version redresses several weaknesses of the previous draft that had received the Lok Sabha's nod — crucial changes include the bringing in of commercial projects as well as real estate agents in the ambit of the bill.

In early 2014, a Congress-led government in Maharashtra became the first state government to frame a law to regulate and develop the housing sector. Today, the party stands in the way of a similar reform at the national level. The real estate bill may not be as eye-catching as the GST bill, but it also promises to bring about much-needed change. Political parties like the Congress and the BJD, therefore, who were at the forefront of stalling the Rajya Sabha on Wednesday, should introspect.

 

squall

(of a baby or small child) cry noisily and continuously.

 

adversely

In an adverse manner; "she was adversely affected by the new regulations"

 

con·ver·gence

The process or state of converging

.

lop·sid·ed

With one side lower or smaller than the other.

 

stip·u·late

Demand or specify (a requirement), typically as part of a bargain or agreement.

 

man·da·to·ry

Required by law or rules; compulsory.

 

dis·clo·sure

The action of making new or secret information known.

 

am·bit

The scope, extent, or bounds of something.

 

fore·front

The leading or most important position or place.

 

in·tro·spect

Examine one's own thoughts or feelings.

 

stall

(of a motor vehicle or its engine) stop running, typically because of an overload on the engine.

 

The Guardian

view on Syria policy: Isis is the enemy but Assad is the problem



s forces loyal to Syria's president Bashar al-Assad regained control of a significant part of the city of Homs this week, it is important to remember how Syria has reached this point. Almost five years ago Syrians came out in their hundreds of thousands to demonstrate largely peacefully for the freedoms that others had mobilised for during the Arab spring. The dictator reacted by unleashing a brutal wave of violence against his own citizens, including Scud missiles, chemical weapons and barrel bombs. Partly because there was no western intervention to protect civilians, the anti-Assad uprising reacted by becoming increasingly associated with jihadism, their main external support coming from the Gulf states.



In this context, Islamic State, casting itself as a defender of the majority Sunni population targeted by Mr Assad, took control of large swaths of territory, even while slaughtering many Sunnis too. Mr Assad's policy of mass murder, which accounts for most of the 300,000 violent deaths in Syria, and the displacement of over half of the country's population (4 million of whom are refugees abroad) has been the main engine behind the rise of Isis in Syria.



All of this bears repeating as the west intensifies its campaign against Isis and as the local ceasefire in Homs began to take effect this week. As documents published in the Guardian this week have shown, Isis's self-proclaimed caliphate has plans to become a full-blown state stretching across Syria and Iraq. Mr Assad's propaganda, echoed by Russia, claims that he is an indispensable ally in the fight against Isis. Yet nothing could be further from the truth. Mr Assad's military, just like Russia's, has focused most of its operations against anti-Assad rebels. The ceasefire in the Homs district of Al-Waer, in the city that was the "capital" of the 2011 uprising, is a painful symbol of the reality that Mr Assad's aim is to make sure there is nothing left in Syria but him and Isis.



If Isis is to be defeated, the best hope of building ground forces capable of pushing it out of the areas it controls can only come from local Sunni groups. To harness the support of those groups – who for four years now have felt abandoned by the west – it is essential to maintain the message that Mr Assad is no ally, and that he cannot be part of a long-term solution for Syria.



This isn't Iraq in 2003. Conditions must be created to ensure the Syrian state can survive without Mr Assad. Anything that smacks of the de-Ba'athification that was such a disaster in Iraq must be avoided. Minorities will need to be given security guarantees, especially the Alawite community from which the Assad family comes. But as diplomatic efforts continue, alongside the necessary battle against Isis, it remains essential to ensure that no meaningful political transition can allow Mr Assad to remain entrenched in power. Isis is the enemy, but Mr Assad is the problem. Indeed, as long as Mr Assad remains, Isis will remain too – and its terrorism will grow.



 

un·leash

Release from a leash or restraint

 

bru·tal

Savagely violent.

 

scud

Move fast in a straight line because or as if driven by the wind

 

swath

A row or line of grass, grain, or other crop as it lies when mown or reaped.

 

slaugh·ter

Kill (animals) for food.

 

caliphate

The era of Islam's ascendancy from the death of Mohammed until the 13th century; some Moslems still maintain that the Moslem world must always have a calif as head of the community; "their goal was to reestablish the Caliphate

 

prop·a·gan·da

Information, especially of a biased or misleading nature, used to promote or publicize a particular political cause or point of view.

 

ech·o

(of a sound) be repeated or reverberate after the original sound has stopped

 

in·dis·pen·sa·ble

Absolutely necessary.

 

har·ness

A set of straps and fittings by which a horse or other draft animal is fastened to a cart, plow, etc., and is controlled by its driver.

 

smack

A sharp slap or blow, typically one given with the palm of the hand.

 

A·la·wi

A member of a Shiite Muslim group living mainly in Syria.

 

en·trench

Establish (an attitude, habit, or belief) so firmly that change is very difficult or unlikely.

 

The Dawn

State Bank on CPEC





SOME important remarks made by the State Bank governor, Ashraf Mahmood Wathra, about transparency in the China-Pakistan Economic Corridor projects deserve careful consideration.



In an interview given to Reuters, Mr Wathra said that "CPEC needs to be made more transparent", going on to indicate that many crucial details of the various projects to be executed under the CPEC umbrella remain hidden even from him.



For example, he said that out of $46bn, he does not know "how much is debt, how much is equity and how much is in kind". Details of this sort are important to know because they can help us understand the potential economic impact that CPEC will have in the future, given the many hopes attached to this project.



The State Bank has also repeatedly invoked the CPEC projects as the best hope for reviving growth in the country, but whether this is merely wishful thinking or a realistic expectation can only be determined if crucial financial details of the projects are known.



In a later clarification, the State Bank asserted that it remains positive about CPEC, but it stood by its transparency concerns.



Also read: Pakistan should be more transparent on $46bn China deal, SBP head says



The governor's remarks are notable for a number of reasons. This is the first time that the need for greater transparency in CPEC has been mentioned from such an important platform as the State Bank.



Since the economy is faced with dwindling inflows of foreign investment and exports, it is crucial to know how its foreign exchange-earning capacity is going to shape up in the years to come, especially in light of the rising external debt burden that the government has been taking on.



Even though the government tells us that its plans to build industrial estates along the route of the road link from Gwadar to Khunjerab will help boost exports, Mr Wathra is entirely correct when he acknowledges this vision but adds that "we need to see this plan with more clarity".



The CPEC project may indeed have tremendous potential for the country but only if it is implemented properly. By steadfastly refusing to share any of the crucial details of the various projects that make up the CPEC bouquet — even with stakeholders as important and central to its execution and impact as the State Bank — the government is not shoring up confidence in its capacity to oversee the implementation of such a large vision.

 

 

reuters

Reuters is an international news agency headquartered in Canary Wharf, London, United Kingdom and a division of Thomson Reuters. Until 2008, the Reuters news agency formed part of an independent company, Reuters Group plc, which was also a provider of financial market data

 

trans·par·ent

(of a material or article) allowing light to pass through so that objects behind can be distinctly seen.

 

in·voke

Cite or appeal to (someone or something) as an authority for an action or in support of an argument.

 

re·vive

Restore to life or consciousness.

 

as·sert

State a fact or belief confidently and forcefully.

 

dwin·dle

Diminish gradually in size, amount, or strength.

 

tre·men·dous

Very great in amount, scale, or intensity

 

shor·ing

Shores or props used to support or hold up something weak or unstable.

 

 

Editorial with hindi vocab

 

The Hindu: December 10, 2015

The Gandhis must face the courts




Whatever( जो कुछ भी) be the merits( गुण) of the charges against the principal office-bearers(धारक ) of the Congress party in the 'National Herald' case, it is an issue that has to be settled in a court of law, and not in the wider political arena( कार्यक्षेत्र ), much less in Parliament. If the Congress believes there has been no wrongdoing(अन्याय ) in the transactions related to the acquisition(अधिग्राहण) of Associated Journals Private Ltd. by Young Indian, a non-profit company in which the party's president, Sonia Gandhi, and vice-president, Rahul Gandhi, are the main shareholders, it must simply choose the judicial( न्यायिक) route to establish their innocence. The Delhi High Court order upholding the trial court summons(बुलावा ) to both of them, along with other directors of Young Indian, is based on what it sees as prima facie( प्रथम दृष्टि में) evidence ( सबूत )of criminality. The best way to deal with the situation is to face it legally. When Subramanian Swamy first questioned the legality of the transactions, it was the Congress that challenged(ललकार ) him to take Ms. Gandhi and her son to court. "It is for those who make allegations( इलज़ाम) to prove their charges," the party had said in 2012. It cannot then turn around( कायापलट कर देना) now and say that the entire proceedings amount to political vendetta( प्रतिशोध). Even if there is a political motive, the party's president and vice-president have to provide answers to the questions that have arisen(उठना) from the trial court summons(बुलावा ) and the High Court's refusal to intervene(हस्तक्षेप करना). To disrupt(गड़बड़ करना) Parliament on an issue that involves no larger public interest goes against all democratic norms, and it cannot be justified on any count. Indeed, to speak of political vendetta following a court summons is to cast aspersions(दोष) on the very independence of the judiciary(न्यायपालिका).




A look at the facts of the case does make one doubt whether AJL could not have protected its shareholders' interests by liquidating( बेच डालना) some of its assets in order to return its loan to the Congress. The floating(अल्पकालिक) of Young Indian, described by the court as a 'special purpose vehicle', does cast some suspicion(अविश्वास ). At the same time, the weak point in Dr. Swamy's case seems to be the absence of any identifiable( पहचान योग्य) victim(पीड़ित) who has been cheated or whose funds have been misappropriated. After all, the various assets of AJL still stand in its name and the shareholders of Young Indian, which being a Section 25 (non-profit) company, cannot get any dividend or profit out of the company's rental income. The Congress will have to believe in its own contention( प्रतिविरोध) that there was no 'entrustment' in the first place for anyone's trust to be breached( उल्लंघन ) and that no one claims to be deceived(धोख़ा देना) or cheated. But the judicial process will have to be faced squarely( वर्गमूल) without resort to political theatre. The charges of cheating and criminal breach of trust against the Congress leaders will have to be countered(प्रतिकार करना) only through the legal route.

 

 

The Hindu: December 10, 2015

Trumpeting bigotry( कट्टरता )




American politics touched a new low this week when Donald Trump, a frontrunner for the Republican presidential nomination(नामांकन ), called for a "total and complete shutdown(बंद करना) of Muslims entering the United States". Mr. Trump's controversial( विवादग्रस्त) remarks( आलोचना ) in the past, including offensive( अपमानजनक) statements about undocumented(बिना दस्तावेज़ का) Mexican immigrants( किसी देश में जाने वाला) being rapists, insults to war veterans(अनुभवी व्यक्ति ) and sexist attacks on women in the media, drew expected criticism( आलोचना ) from Democrats and other liberals. Yet, this time even fellow Republican candidates and mainstream( मुख्यधारा ) Republican Party heavyweights distanced themselves from Mr. Trump's views on Muslims. The property mogul's comment contradicts( विपरीत होना), morally if not legally, the First Amendment to the U.S. Constitution, which requires that "Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting( निषेध करने की आज्ञा ) the free exercise thereof". Islamophobia in the U.S., which surged(आगे बढ़ना) after the 9/11 terror attacks, appears to be on the rise again. This time it is coterminous(सीमा) with soaring(उड़नेवाला) worldwide anxiety(उत्सुकता) about Islamic State, which has been linked to the Paris terror attacks of November and last week's shooting in San Bernardino, California. Little wonder then that the numerically significant cohorts(संगी) of the U.S. conservative( वर्तमान नियम के बदले जाने का विरोधी) fold are lapping up(उत्सुकतापूर्वक ग्रहण करना) Mr. Trump's incendiary(भड़काने वाला), divisive proposal. Their support is manifested(व्यक्त) in the one polling trend that has baffled( चकित) campaign analysts, Mr. Trump's evergreen( लोकप्रिय) lead over all other candidates, which shows no sign of withering( तिरस्कारपूर्ण) in the face of his increasingly reckless(असावधान) provocations(उकसाना). After this week's foray(आक्रमण ) into apparent(स्पष्ट) bigotry( कट्टरपन ), a rolling five-day poll by Reuters placed his support vote at 35.6 per cent, giving him a comfortable lead over Florida's Senator Marco Rubio, a distant second at 14.9 per cent.




The Trump phenomenon( अद्भुत वस्तु () begs( निवेदन करना) questions both tactical(सुनियोजित) and strategic. Tactically, he has made a stark( पूर्ण रूप से) choice in the matter of battle-versus-war and it could well win him the Republican nomination. His steady( संतुलित) march(अभियान) to the far right of American politics is a safe bet that he will emerge(उभर कर आना), or has already emerged, as the favourite of those who championed the cause of the Tea Party, of immigration hawks(हिंसक व्यक्ति), pro-lifers, white supremacists, gun-lovers and all manner of conservatives. However, that leaves the rest of America unaccounted( समझाया जा सकने योग्य) for, especially the elusive(भटकाने वाला) median( मध्य मूल्य) and swing voters. Unless Mr. Trump abruptly( आकस्मिक रूप से) changes tack ( जहाज की दिशा बदलना )post-nomination, a move that could prove politically costly in itself, he may have handed the Democratic nominee, likely to be Hillary Clinton, the keys to the Oval(अंडाकार) Office next year. Beyond the nomination battle, the broader strategic link between the rise of IS and the worldwide proliferation( प्रसार) of Islamophobia is paramount(सर्व श्रेष्ठ). Perhaps mindful of this link, Ms. Clinton has moved in exactly the opposite direction, towards the political centre. She has taken a firmer( मजबूत) stand against IS than President Barack Obama did, yet spoken expansively(ठाठ से) about fostering(पालन-पोषण ) an attitude of inclusiveness. Depending on which paradigm(paradigm) prevails( प्रचलन), post-2016 America will either continue to welcome minorities to its shores(समुद्र का किनारा), or emerge( उभर कर आना) as a source of recruitment propaganda( फैलाना) for extremists(चरमपंथी).

 

 

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